Anode and cathode reactions for biofuel cells based on direct electron transfer reactions between biological components and electrodes

Lo Gorton 

Lund University, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Lund SE-221 00, Sweden

Abstract

This presentation will give an overview and discuss a series of anode and cathode reactions based on direct electron transfer between the biological component (enzyme/organelle/whole cell) and various electrodes for possible applications in biofuel cells. Cathode reactions will include those based on direct electron transfer between enzymes able to reduce oxygen directly to water such as the high potential blue multicopper oxidases (laccase and bilirubin oxidase) and electrodes [1]. Anode reactions will cover those based on direct electron transfer between both isolated redox enzymes (e.g., diaphorase, alcohol PQQ dehydrogenase, cellobiose dehydrogenase, hydrogenase [2,3]) and electrodes as well as direct electron transfer between bacteria and electrodes [4,5].

  1. S. Shleev, J. Tkac, A. Christenson, T. Ruzgas, A. I. Yaropolov, J. Whittaker, L. Gorton, Biosens. Bioelectron., 20 (2005) 2517-2554.
  2. E. E. Ferapontova, S. Shleev, T. Ruzgas, L. Stoica, A. Christenson, J. Tkac, A. I. Yaropolov, L. Gorton, in Electrochemistry of Nucleic Acids and Proteins (Eds. E. Palacek, F. W. Scheller, J. Wang), Elsevier, Amsterdam, 2005, pp. 517-598.
  3. U. Wollenberger, in Biosensors and Modern Biospecific Analytical Techniques (Ed. L. Gorton), Elsevier, Amsterdam, 2005, pp. 65-130.
  4. G. Reguera, K. D. McCarthy, T. Mehta, J. S. Nicoll, M. T. Tuominen, D. R. Lovley,   Nature, 435 (2005) 1098-1101.
  5. F. Davis, S. P. J. Higson, Biosens. Bioelectron. 22 (2007) 1224-1235.
 

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Presentation: Tutorial lecture at SMCBS'2007 International Workshop, by Lo Gorton
See On-line Journal of SMCBS'2007 International Workshop

Submitted: 2007-08-31 13:19
Revised:   2009-06-07 00:44