Integrating nanomaterials with nano/micro platforms to achieve enhanced chemical sensing performance

Kurt D. Benkstein ,  Reit Artzi-Gerlitz ,  Carlos J. Martinez ,  Baranidharan Raman ,  Douglas C. Meier ,  Steve Semancik 

National Institute of Standards and Technology, Chemical Science and Technology Laboratory (NIST), 100 Bureau Drive, MS-8362, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899, United States

Abstract

Real world chemical and biochemical sensing applications present significant challenges related to the required levels of sensitivity, selectivity, speed and reliability. Various types and forms of nanomaterials offer an approach toward meeting these needs, particularly when they are used in conjunction with advanced sensor operating and signal processing modes. In this presentation we emphasize the increased capabilities that can be realized when oxide nanomaterials, used as chemiresistors, are integrated with two types of platforms: anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) nanopore arrays and MEMS microhotplate arrays. The AAO devices employ top-and-bottom contacts, and a flow-through scheme that accesses the high (internal) surface area of an array of parallel WO3 nanotubes, to greatly enhance the sensitivity (102 to 103 over planar forms) [1]. We have also integrated a variety of oxide nanomaterials (nanoparticles, porous nanoparticle microshells, nanowires, nano-textured CVD films) into arrays of elements that can be individually temperature programmed [2,3]. Several examples will be used to illustrate how temperature-modulated operation with such nanostructured oxides produce dense data streams for complex monitoring and detection scenarios. Recent results that will be described briefly include sensing of low level chemical hazards in dynamic backgrounds and the recognition of disease-related target analytes in synthetic breath [4].

Current address (RA-G): National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland
Current address (CJM): Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana

[1] R. Artzi-Gerlitz, K.D. Benkstein, D.L. Lahr, J.L. Hertz, C.B. Montgomery, J.E. Bonevich, S. Semancik and M.J. Tarlov, Sensors and Actuators B 136, 257-264 (2009).

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Presentation: Invited oral at E-MRS Fall Meeting 2009, Symposium F, by Steve Semancik
See On-line Journal of E-MRS Fall Meeting 2009

Submitted: 2009-05-15 19:51
Revised:   2009-06-30 20:36
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