Gender Disparities in the Management of Judicial Systems in Europe

Beata Gruszczyńska 

Abstract

Implementation of European standards and improving the justice systems in all member states is the crucial goal for the European Commission for the Efficiency of Justice (CEPEJ) in the Council of Europe. Following the adoption of a Declaration “Making equality between women and men a reality in practice” expert group for evaluation of judicial systems decided to include gender equality indicators to the systematic self-report Scheme survey.

In last Scheme conducted in 2012 we asked about gender distribution among professional judges sitting in the first, second instance and in the supreme courts and also within professional prosecution staff. Moreover, all member states of European Council answered on the question about gender distribution among court presidents and within heads of the prosecution offices. Results show that on average 52% men and 48% of women are working as a professional judges in the courts in European states but in cross-countries analysis variety in gender equality is clearly visible. The percentage of females within judges is from less than 25 in Azerbaijan, Armenia UK (Scotland), UK (England and Wales) and Ireland to about 80 in Slovenia Latvia, Romania, in Poland is equal about 65.

From the perspective of persons, who manage the courts and prosecutor offices balance of gender is even more disturbed. Women chair the jurisdiction evidently less often then a men and it is especially true in judicial hierarchy. Among 26 states, who provided information only 8 had a woman as a president of Supreme Court and similar situation is observed in the highest Prosecutor Offices in European countries. Paper elaborates more details related to the topic above.

 

Presentation: Oral at Current Economic and Social Topics CEST2013, Symosium on Gender Disparities, by Beata Gruszczyńska
See On-line Journal of Current Economic and Social Topics CEST2013

Submitted: 2013-05-18 08:57
Revised:   2013-05-22 15:54